East Arcadia’s sophomore album, a follow-up to their sold-out, self-released CD, “All the Same,” was recorded by Matt Allison (Lawrence Arms, Alkaline Trio, The Methadones, The Copyrights) at Atlas Studios in Chicago. What resulted was a collection of amazing political and emotional songs that will be a part of your constant rotation…just you wait and see!

::PRESS::

Faster-paced, opinionated melodic hardcore that can teach you something. Very, very honest and lots to say, EAST ARCADIA is not a fashion, it’s their lives and that’s why it’s sincere… there’s no put-ons. Fantastic cover art.
NO FRONT TEETH UK webzine

Five guys…play generic new skool punk in the Epitaph records mould. There are some smart observations in the lyrics, but the execution is flat. Dire vocals and ringing guitars combine to paint a Bad Religion picture. The playing is far above par, but the music is way too familiar.
(Mark) SHREDDING PAPER, Issue #15, April 2003

Busy musicians set the tone for some energetic, nearly hardcore, pop punk with vocals and lyrics mining the tortured human soul.
(AS) PUNK PLANET, Issue #54, March/April 2003

Imagine Milo from the Descendents singing for Good Riddance.
(Donofthedead) RAZORCAKE, online, March 2003

Pop punk with meaningful, if non-specific lyrics. Some bands tell you society sucks, some show you how it does, or why it does, these guys write metaphors around it. There is a definite posi-core vibe to this– there is bad, but a feeling we will overcome. I keep going back and forth between if these guys remind me more of Strike Anywhere (which they sound a LOT like–more in an affinity sense than a rip off one) or the weird rarity of Christian punk that is more punk than Christian (it does exist, it’s just really unusual). I don’t mean preaching, I mean having lyrics about personal responsibility and being good and society and that, and music that backs it up. I like this, but I kept looking for the Jesus references that are hidden somewhere.
(Rich) RAZORCAKE, Issue #12, Feb/March 2003

Although one could group East Arcadia into the “Fat Wreck sound” category, their music actually sounds more similar to Strike Anywhere and Kid Dynamite, and I often here the Broadways influence. They keep up a fast pace and are quite melodic, while their lyrics are well thought-out and not about dumb shit that most Fat Wreck-style bands sing about. The album is all over the place; it never lets up. The tradeoff vocal parts and insane drumming keep this interesting. I recall seeing the band play a year and a half ago and they were full of energy and nice guys, so you can be assured there is not an asshole factor. Good stuff.
(WR) MAXIMUM ROCK N ROLL, Issue #236, January 2003